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September 25, 2019

With a little imagination, one can see the state of Kentucky as a slightly misshapen stone arrowhead, the point of which lies to the far west of the state. Rather than being known as “The Kentucky Arrowhead” or some such moniker, it is instead known as the Jackson Purchase, so named because it was purchased from the Chickasaw Indians by Andrew Jackson in 1818. Covering just over 3,000 square miles, the region is bounded by the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to the north and west, and by Kentucky Lake to the east, and it is home to a remarkable population of Americans. Read more …

August 10, 2019

Interstate Magazine photographed El Paso in mid March of this year. Then, on August 3, 2019, a lone shooter opened fire at the Cielo Vista Walmart, killing 22 people and injuring 24 more. Events like this jarringly alter a city, as if the entire population were involved in a high speed car crash. Still, while the El Paso of today undoubtedly feels different from the El Paso photographed this past March, those earlier photographs nonetheless capture the same, ever evolving El Paso. It is a city that wears its Mexican roots unapologetically on its sleeve, integral to the warp and weft of the American tapestry. Read more …

July 4, 2019

In part 1 of this series, we visited the people of Trans Pecos Texas. The exploration of this impossibly boundless American region continues in part 2, exploring the seemingly endless land that forms the backdrop to daily Trans Pecos life.. Read more…

June 28, 2019

To the farthest west of Texas, beyond the Pecos River, is Trans Pecos Texas, the bent elbow of the state. Forming only a part of the whole of Texas, the Trans Pecos defies the basic laws of geometry, seemingly outsizing by itself the whole of Texas combined. This photo journal explores the people inhabiting in this outsized, endless land. Read more…

May 17, 2019

Part 2 of our visit to Louisiana Highway 1 focuses on the southern portion of the highway. Highway 1’s southern stretch winds through the core of America’s sugar can industry, a swath of industrial chemical production, and ultimately into the heart of Cajun country, ending abruptly in the Gulf of Mexico. Read more…

May 1, 2019

Louisiana Highway 1 is to Louisiana what Broadway is the island of Manhattan: a top-left-to-bottom-right byway that traverses a number of neighborhoods of blurred boundaries. Starting in the northwest corner of Louisiana, a tail end of Texas cowboy culture yields to a Louisiana inflected south and seamlessly merges into the distinctive Cajun bayou. This Photo Journal presents the first half of our travels on Highway 1, the northern half. Read more…

March 6, 2019

East St. Louis was once a thriving riverside industrial town, but its fortunes unraveled in the middle of the last century, when industry left and the residential tax base followed. Throughout the city, rundown, abandoned lots form a backdrop to poverty and to crime. Yet while living in East St. Louis is not easy, its people persist. They work, play and carry on, revealing a decidedly determined side of the American Identity. Read more…

September 25, 2019

The Jackson Purchase, the subject of our most recent Photo Journal, is home to a diverse group of people. From farmers to small-city folk, the people of The Jackson Purchase share a quiet confidence that informs not only their daily lives, but their interactions with others. Read more …

August 10, 2019

The recent, horrific events at the Cielo Vista Walmart have thrust the city of El Paso, Texas front and center before the American people. Interstate Magazine photographed El Paso back in March, before the events of August 3. A city cannot emerge from a horror like the Cielo Vista Walmart mass shooting without being transformed. So how could Interstate Magazine publish the March photographs so soon after that earlier version of the city had been dispatched forever? It seemed a question difficult to answer. Read more…

July 4, 2019

Trans Pecos encompasses incomprehensibly vast space. It at once both fills and is the void: empty yet palpable, at hand but unreachable, and above all else, overwhelming of the sense of self. Read more . . .

June 19, 2019

From identical twins and mere siblings, to cousins first and far removed, to unrelated souls of like lineage, to utterly random pairs of persons, at any point on the spectrum, two people differ in ways both subtle and manifest. One can propound little counterargument here. But what of the single individual? How singular is he in his affect? How true is the statement that “John Doe is John Doe”? In truth, it is not – visually, at least. Read more . . .

May 17, 2019

In many ways, LA 1 reflects all of America beyond it. The route traverses numerous, distinct domains, each Louisianian but each decidedly its own. The inhabitants of the timber and oil environs of the northwest share more in common with their fellow cattle ranchers and oilmen in Texas than they do with the Cajuns inhabiting southern LA 1. The shrimpers of the Gulf share more perhaps, with fellow fishermen working the Gulf in Mississippi and Alabama to the east than they do with the sugar cane and chemical plant workers found midway along LA 1. Different as these distinct sub-locales are, their inhabitants are 100% Louisianian in ways both mundane and profound, in precisely the same way that all Americans, despite their diversity and differences, are each 100% American Read more . . .

April 5, 2019

The geography and things of a place form a stage upon which we strut and fret our respective hours. Capturing the details of that stage is important, but if one hopes to convey a full sense of a human place, then capturing the people playing upon that stage is even more important. We must photograph the people to show the place, but who do we photograph and how do we do it? Read more . . .