August 10, 2019

Interstate Magazine photographed El Paso in mid March of this year. Then, on August 3, 2019, a lone shooter opened fire at the Cielo Vista Walmart, killing 22 people and injuring 24 more. Events like this jarringly alter a city, as if the entire population were involved in a high speed car crash. Still, while the El Paso of today undoubtedly feels different from the El Paso photographed this past March, those earlier photographs nonetheless capture the same, ever evolving El Paso. It is a city that wears its Mexican roots unapologetically on its sleeve, integral to the warp and weft of the American tapestry. Read more…

July 4, 2019

In part 1 of this series, we visited the people of Trans Pecos Texas. The exploration of this impossibly boundless American region continues in part 2, exploring the seemingly endless land that forms the backdrop to daily Trans Pecos life.. Read more…

June 28, 2019

To the farthest west of Texas, beyond the Pecos River, is Trans Pecos Texas, the bent elbow of the state. Forming only a part of the whole of Texas, the Trans Pecos defies the basic laws of geometry, seemingly outsizing by itself the whole of Texas combined. This photo journal explores the people inhabiting in this outsized, endless land. Read more…

May 17, 2019

Part 2 of our visit to Louisiana Highway 1 focuses on the southern portion of the highway. Highway 1’s southern stretch winds through the core of America’s sugar can industry, a swath of industrial chemical production, and ultimately into the heart of Cajun country, ending abruptly in the Gulf of Mexico. Read more…

May 1, 2019

Louisiana Highway 1 is to Louisiana what Broadway is the island of Manhattan: a top-left-to-bottom-right byway that traverses a number of neighborhoods of blurred boundaries. Starting in the northwest corner of Louisiana, a tail end of Texas cowboy culture yields to a Louisiana inflected south and seamlessly merges into the distinctive Cajun bayou. This Photo Journal presents the first half of our travels on Highway 1, the northern half. Read more…

March 6, 2019

East St. Louis was once a thriving riverside industrial town, but its fortunes unraveled in the middle of the last century, when industry left and the residential tax base followed. Throughout the city, rundown, abandoned lots form a backdrop to poverty and to crime. Yet while living in East St. Louis is not easy, its people persist. They work, play and carry on, revealing a decidedly determined side of the American Identity. Read more…

updated January 25, 2019

Illinois Highway 37 strings through five counties in southern Illinois. Without stopping to see the sights – not that any sights actually exist for the casual tourist – traversing its entire length would barely require a full afternoon. Yet despite its short stature and modest dress, IL37 reveals a distinctly American scene, utterly hidden from the featureless interstate 57 humming just to the west within constant sight of 37. Read more…

updated October 11, 2018

Bowling as a quintessentially American pastime took root in the early 1950’s and grew through mid-1960’s, when there were approximately 12,000 of these "blue-collar country clubs” throughout the United States. Since then, the number of bowling alleys has steadily declined, dipping to roughly 5,000 as of 2007 and just under 4,700 in 2017. Still, bowling alleys permeate America and remain a cross-sectional institution. Read more…

(These photos are excerpted from the upcoming book, “Bowling the American Dream”)

updated October 7, 2018

Fort Smith is a city of 87,443, located on the western end of the Arkansas River Valley, a valley running across the mid-section of the state. It anchors a population region of 298,592 residents that spans three Arkansas counties and two Oklahoma counties. This median income for a household in the city is $32,157. Read more…